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christmas in new york 73 unless you are manger square in bethlehem. >> clayton: we'll tell you about people stuck on the tarmac. five or six hours. if you were trapped or stuck in texas let us know. >> we have a folks news - fox news alert. former president bush's condition has worsened. he is 88 years old and he was formerally the president . he was hospitalized for a cough . and family spokesman admits things are not going well but doctors remain cautiously optmistic. >> he's in critical condition and in a bad way. the doctors believe there is a path for him to recover from this and if we can get him to rally a bit we will talk about a discharge date. >> he is alert and joking with the staff at methodist hospital. we'll have a live report from houston in the bottom of the hour. stay tuned for that . dozens of people singing "amazing grace" last night as they remember the two firefighters murded in webster, new york. ♪ i once was lost, but now i am found. >> the community coming together to honor these two men. they were shot and killed in an excon's christmas eve bash. we are hearing fr
york city, for instance. >> dave: new jersey, connecticut. >> clayton: you're not living the dream. >> juliet: it's sort of subjective. well, actually not subjective you can look exactly at what people live here for 250 or people in san francisco, another expensive city, it doesn't go that long, didn't go that far. >> dave: the bottom line, it appears they've moved the goal post and it may be around the $400,000 mark and that may be the new 250 if you will. may be where ne get the deal done. and upwards towards the 500 mark, but here are two congressmen on perhaps moving this up. >> the $400,000 level seems to me to be about right, that represents about the top 1% of the income earners, the people who got 93% of the income growth our last year and that seems to be enough, but i think there's some flexibility there. >> it's about making sure that we can live within our means and address the real problem and that's spending. i kind of feel like i'm a lifeguard and we've got to save as many people from drowning in higher taxes as we can. >> clayton: that seems to be the new threshold
these discussions to the american people and i look forward to hearing from my friend from new york and what he has to say. we have talked about time and again about the importance of what we are trying to accomplish in this house in protecting the medicare program. i represent a district that has 135,000 medicare beneficiaries. it's actually the fourth most medicare beneficiaries of any congressional district in the country. so the people that i represent have a strong interest, as does every member of this house in making sure that medicare is preserved, it's protected and strengthened and it's always going to be be there, not just for the 135,000 beneficiaries that participate in the medicare program today, but for generations to come. and we aren't going to stand here as democrats or republicans or any political affiliation and say that everything is working perfectly and nothing needs to be altered. the fact is with regard to medicare that 1/3 of the people who qualify for medicare, 1/3 of the people who qualify for medicare today use every penny that they have paid into the system over the co
-shawn shootout at a house fire in rochester, new york. it appears that the blaze was set at a trap. correspondent david lee miller has details. hello. >> doug, authorities say a convicted killer paroled after serving 17 years in prison was responsible for the deadly ambush that killed two firefighters in upstate new york, outside of rochester. police are trying to figure out a motive for the rampage. >> predawn call to volunteerment for to put out this house blaze ended in tragedy. firefighters were met with gunfire. one of the injured described the scene in a call for help to a radio dispatcher. >> we're shot at, multiple firemen down. i think he used assault rifles. multiple firemen down. working fire. >> two firefighters for killed. one of woman worked as police officer. two others were seriously wounded. >> this is still an active investigation. but at first blush it appear it was a trap. >> police arrived and opened fire on shooter. gunman who took his own life identified as 62-year-old william spangleer. he had a criminal past. >> spangler was a convicted felon. he is not allowed to possess
to newark. even though he spenz his time in new york. >> i love cory booker. leave him alone. >> the one republican here loves cory booker. >> so now the big issue he wants to represent in 2014, he wants to run for president. 2014 you have a democratic, frank lautenberg who will be 90 in 2014. he's not said he's retiring. frank lautenberg made the biggest mistake he left the senate after three terms. he left the senate. he was miserable for two years he told everybody who asked the biggest mistake he ever made. he caught a break in 2002 when they put him back on the ballot. take a lot to get him out of there but booker could beat him. >> the e.r.a. the potential race that i'm excited about, sanford v sanford an i'm not talking about the 1891 supreme court case. i'm talking about mark appalachian trail sanford who is rumored to want to run for tim scott's south carolina '01 seat but in a too good to be true twist so does his ex-wife jenni. >> love it. >> amazing. >> it is a movie. >> i hope this happens just so we can talk about it for however long that lasts. >> is this a woody allen mov
issue in washington is of course the gun laws. here is an article from "the new york times." here is a picture of chad knox in ohio. just a little bit from this article -- we want to spend this first section of the "washington journal" asking gun owners only to call in and whether or not they think any of the gun laws should be changed. you can see the phone numbers on your screen. you can also contact us by social media as well. please identify yourself as a gun owner. you can make a comment on facebook page. or send an e-mail. a little bit more from this "new york times" article -- that is in "the new york times" this morning. from "the washington post" -- that is an "the washington post." gun owners only we want to hear thinkwhether or not use iyou gun laws should be changed. caller: i do not think gun laws should be changed. in new york, we are in a quandary still with the assault weapons ban. as a citizen in new york, assault weapons did not drop in new york. they still have their own assault weapons ban. you can have assault weapons in new york as long as they are manufactur
. this is the front page of "the new york times." host: the story goes on. this is luke rosak. host: it goes on to talk about that story. front page of "the new york daily news." this stemming from upstate new york about a sniper that set fire to a building and goes on to shoot two firemen as they were trying to take care of the fire. eric from pittsburgh, pennsylvania on the democrat's line. good morning. caller: michael moore. host: i'm sorry? caller: michael moore. capitalism is dead. host: george, good morning. caller: good morning. george will. he is not an office holder and has no intention of running for public office. he gave a lecture in st. louis on december 4 and it was aired on c-span last evening. it was about progressivism and how would differs from thomas jefferson's vision and view of the basis for our government founded in natural rights. wilson was the opposite in his view. a little bit of a man involved subject. the movement started with president wilson and basically 100 years ago. george will analyze it in his lecture at the differences between the declaration of indepen
don't realize, there are many more to be licensees that other people realize. in new york, where i am, the number is 28. there was a large allocation of these licenses before cable and satellite and what we're doing now, and this is the -- i think innovation of auctions, how can we use market mechanisms to reallocate some of that spectrum to mobile broadband in a win-win way? and that is what we're doing. that is why there will be brauferts who remain in new york and -- broadcasters who remain in new york and others. there is tremendous opportunity to free up spectrum to promote innovation. >> when we moved over the 200 megahertz in 2003, we had a two-star general who said it's absolutely technologically impossible to do. so again, do you have a process that's totally fair to the broadcasters and to the wireless industry that's in place? have you had them in your office simultaneously with their engineers to talk about the issues so that you can hear and your experts can hear the differences which they have? >> that's exactly what we're doing. through the notice and comment process, t
what's amazing about this? outside of the metropolitan new york area nobody cares about this. nobody. >> p but we're sitting in the middle of the metropolitan area. >> you're optimistic, a lot of people in the metropolitan area don't care. >> especially after this season. sanchez had his best game of the season week 1 against the bills. he completed over 70% of passes. people predicted the jets would go undefeated. they were wrong. time for college football now. duke and cincinnati facing off in the always epic belk bowl in charlotte. let's start at the end. the fourth quarter, game tied, 34-34 with a minute and a half left. the ball is loose, and the bearcats recover. they have a chance to win it in the final minute in the ensuing cincinnati possession. he fights his tight end and finds him. travis kelsey waddles along and outruns the secondary and goes all the way for an 83-yard td. that's your game winner. bearcats win 48-34. >> the real bowl games begin tonight. >> virginia tech versus rutgers. >> at 5:30 this afternoon. >> i'm going to be awake no matter what. go, hokies. >> 5:3
of snow across upstate new york and northern new england. heavy rain and strong winds pounded coastal areas devastated by superstorm sandy less than two months ago. the winter storm system is now blamed for at least 16 deaths nationwide. here in our area, maryland is reporting a death of a man in frederick county due to hypothermia. officials say the man was 65 or older but they are not releasing any information about the circumstances or his identity. >>> with the chances of more winter weather heading our way, now is a great time to get the fox 5 weather app. search for d.c. weather in the app store. you can also text fox 5 weather to 29473. >>> there is a live look outside the u.s. capitol dome. the weather is going to be changing here. we are getting a little bit of everything and tucker will be busy from here until when? may? >> until march. i like this kind of weather. last winter, ooh. >> kind of boring for you. >> oh, yeah. >> we've got a lot to talk about. this next storm system that is approaching is not going to be a major storm. we are talking a couple of inches of snow at
parents? >> yes. that was part of my interest. back in the new york city public schools, i had a great teacher. mrs. rauf would read -- mrs. roth would read the newspaper and the about martin luther king. he was rising in all of that, and the civil rights movement and she exposed us to lot. but i was just a junkie. the time i was 9 years old, i was handing leaflets out for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay who was running for mayor of new york. i went down to the liberal party headquarters and was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york'. some women thought this was really cute, this little boy and leaflets. and she asked me why. and i made the case and got in early start in my political career. she said this is for you and she hands this box of pastries. i took a back to the liberal headquarters and we opened it up and there were all of these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics -- the district leader grabbed the money and said you can keep the doughn
, "the new york times," the paris review, the yale review and elsewhere. she has been the recipient of the irish times' prize for international fiction, the rea award for the short story, the o'henry award and a landen fellowship. she was a member of the american academy of arts and letters, and it gives me great pleasure to introduce lori moore. [applause] ♪ ♪ >> the other members of this year's jury for the national book award in fiction are stacy, dinale and janet perry. [applause] why would these otherwise sane, reasonable and brilliant people consent to this chore? one where you make a thousand enemies and maybe only one friend, one where your front porch fills up with packages, and your neighbors think you have a terrible late night online shopping habit. [laughter] through the entire spring and summer. one does it for the champagne, of course, even if the champagne turns out to have a lot of peach stuff in it. [laughter] but one does it, also, to be part of a celebration of the deep mind melt that is reading. how else is a human mind is so fully and exquiz italy -- exquis
minneapolis who wrote an opinion piece, an op ed in "the new york times," and a protection racket where people are controlled by organized criminals, corrupt politicians. when you hear the head of the nra today say that gun laws are not the answer it really is arming people, arming somebody in that school that could have saved lives, what is your response? >> well, we -- of course, should focus on mental health issues. we should have fewer violent movies and video games and have better security in our schools, but nothing is going to change the fact that the last thing those children saw if they looked up, and i hope they didn't, is the end of a weapon manufactured by his financial backers. lapierre says if one of those teachers had a weapon they could have killed the gunman and could have saved lives and that was the potential outcome had there been someone armed in that school. >> we could always speculate about potential outcomes, but to have more weapons in the schools, particularly in the hands of people other than trained law enforcement, i think, is a very dangerous thing. the point i m
: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the remaking of the obama administration's foreign policy team began today as the president nominated massachusetts senator john kerry to replace hilary clinton as secretary of state. the former presidential candidate who lost to george w. bush in 2004 got the nod after u.n. ambassador susan rice withdrew her name. she'd faced republican criticisms over the benghazi terrorist attack. president obama made the announcement this afternoon at the white house. >> i am very proud to announce my choice for america's next secretary of state, john kerry. in a sense, john's entire life has prepared him for this role. havi
, massachusetts, connecticicut, new york. those are the fiveighest louisia, mississippi alaska, nevada, and alama. the former has theoughest gun lalaws and the lowest gun ownership. the oth five have the h highest gun ownership in the country and the most relaxed laws. >> we have the toughest gun laws in the city. it did not do much to cut down on the violence. it took a lot of policingng to do it. >> >> the state department had not given benghazi the security, both physical and personal resources, it needed. >> former ambassssador thomas pickering, chairman of the accountability review board. the board's report is the result of a pre designation so far- three rignation so fafar, but added that the end of this debate. >> it is not but i feel like -- when somebody is going down the street and they cut someononeff. the other guy isis serious and the errant driversays yoyou are right here that is what happened this week. the ate department saiaid you were right. it sort of took the wind out of the sales of the republican consnspira theorists', i think somewh. a hearing was only an hour-and- a-half l
't. multigrain cheerios >>> back to "hardball." now to the "sideshow." first, why are the folks at "new york magazine" comparing sarah palin to groucho marx? well, it has something to do with this famous groucho line. i don't want to belong to any club that will accept me as a member. here is palin weighing in on "time" magazine's selection of president obama for person of the year. >> "time" magazine, i think there's some irrelevancy there to tell you the truth. consider their list of the most influential people in the country and in the world, some who have made that list, yours truly. that ought to tell you something right there. >> that ought to tell you something right there. there's the groucho connection. she can't be on board with the pick because they considered her back in 2008. >>> humor columnist andy borowitz went in a different direction saying mitt romney could be person of the year if the year was 1912. he wrote a man of the year spoof. quote, even though his quest for the presidency was unsuccessful, mr. romney's ideas about foreign po inequality, and women's rights typified
this columnist for "the new york times" is brilliant in writing. he's a great, great journalist and explains things so well. i really have great admiration for him. he wrote yesterday, "republicans have to realize they are going to have to cave in on tax rates." that's the way it is, mr. president. "they're going to have to cave on tax rates." then on tuesday, day before yesterday, the senior senator from maine, olympia snowe, urged house republican leaders to end the suspense for middle-class taxpayers. "they shouldn't have to wonder whether we will ultimately raise taxes on low- to middle-income people." i assure them we won't raise taxes on the middle class on the poor, is what ow olympia snowe said. yesterday it seemed every practical republican left in washington was suddenly willing to say out loud what we have known for weeks: the only remaining option is for the house to pass the senate bill. dozens of house republicans signed onto a letter urging speaker boehner to take the last hexit before the cliff. neither president obama nor democrats in congress have ever been ambiguous about
. if you are in new york city, schoolteachers and firemen make $100,000 a year and they are easily in households the approach the limit. it depends and where you live. among high-income people, there is a wide range of what people pay in taxes. if you're a lawyer in washington, i find them to be reasonable people who work long hours. you are probably paying 28%. if you are on wall street and you are well-connected if you have a capacity to have your income defined as investment as opposed to salary even though it is indeed salary income. if you are somebody like jamie dimon or warren buffet, you can get away with 14% tax. the real problem with upper individuals are not the people who pay the taxes we intend for the to pay, but all the people who get away without paying any taxes at all. those tax breaks and write offs are derived by the president and by democrats, but they never seem to get fixed. one reason is republicans do not want them fixed. and the other hand, the democrats get a lot of campaign contributions from wall street. that is a real problem on both sides of the aisle
of allegiance will be led by the gentleman from new york, mr. higgins. mr. higgins: i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will entertain requests for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina rise? mr. wilson: madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. wilson: and to revise and extend my remarks. madam speaker, at midnight tonight, our nation is scheduled to fall off the fiscal cliff because the augusta chronicle editorial of december 2 is correct. quote, it's that stubborn adherence to big spending that is powering the momentum toward the fiscal cliff. halting base spending is what's going to stop it. end of editorial. over the past year, house republicans have passed effective bipartisan legislation to prevent the entire fiscal cliff. unfortunately, these bills remain stalled in the senate graveyard. th
for us. in the spring we experienced late freezes in michigan and new york and pennsylvania that wiped out fruit crops. a lot of small family farms, farms in northern michigan wiped out. in my home state late freezes in the spring caused cherry producers to lose practically their entire crop right off the bat. it warmed up, the buds came out, then they had a deep freeze; killed everything. our growers produce 75% of the u.s. supply of cherries. that's around 270 million pounds. and the cherry producers experienced 98% loss. now in our amendment, in the disaster bill and in the farm bill, we give them some help because they spent the rest of the crop year this year having to pay to maintain the orchards and the frees, eating the costs and hoping the trees will bounce back next year and produce a crop. so they have all the costs of maintaining everything but no revenue coming in. cherry producers were also forced to fight spreading diseases like cherry leaf spot and bacterial tinker, making the trees even more costly to maintain and at risk of loss. they didn't just lose their crop this
. nothing to stop the epidemic of senseless gun violence that plague not only our major cities like new york and chicago, but countless small towns throughout our nation, towns with names like newtown, aurora, tucson, dekalb, blacksburg and littleton. in the years i have been a member of this body, this house has not held a single hearing, not one to address gun violence. while over 30,000 americans die each year from gun violence, over 400 lives have been lost by gun violence in my hometown of chicago, people are dying every day. . we in this body are afraid to talk about it. the time has come for us to stop listening to the gun lobby and start listening to the american people. the fact is the majority of americans gun owning and not, desire commonsense, reasonable gun regulation. congress must no longer stand in the way of reasonable legislation, instead we must champion it. the american people want to see background checks required on all firearm purchases instead of the fractions of sales that get done today. 408% of u.s. gun sales are by private sellers who are not required to perform b
was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york and a woman thought this is really cute, this little boy handing out leaflets. she asked me why, and i made the case for lindsay. i got an early start on my political work consulting career. she said that is so cute. she hands me a box of what looked to be pastry, all white box with string. i took it back to the liberal party headquarters and the open it up, and there were all these donuts and a wad of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics. >> tuesday night, david axelrod on his life in journalism and politics. that is followed at 9:30 with all five of new hampshire is all woman delegation. then, growing up at the white house, tuesday evening on c- span. >> george will spoke at washington university in st. louis about the role of religion in politics. the speech was hosted by the john danforth center on politics. we will hear from former senator john danforth, just before mr. will speaks. >> finally, it is my honor to introduce senator john danforth, who will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he gr
bus a deal ever getting done. alison kosik at the new york stock exchange. >> already down for the dow 117 points. kinding seeing a shift in attitude. if you see what's happening over the last few weeks wall street has been banking on a deal and you can see that in how stocks performed. the s&p 500 is up over the past month. guess what? now wall street is nervous, one analyst says this plan b vote was a litmus test for congress's ability to work out a solution. the way wall street sees it now this is a sign of gridlock. the s&p pa 00 is up 15% so just to put that in perspective, get ready for a tough friday so it's hardly time to panic. the sell-off won't last through the end of the day so they're more optimistic. >> could a sell-off influence washington to get something done? >> a sell-off could be a wake-up call for congress, just out playing chicken with the economy and it has worked before. you look at 2008, stock sold off after the house initially rejected a bank bailout. congress came around and passed it. it may take a direct hit to give lawmakers a kick in the butt especially s
officer: the senator from new york. mr. schumer: madam president, we saw what happened here, the minority leader filibustering his own bill. he should have trusted his first instincts. imagine if we would have passed the minority leader's resolution. the markets would have been jubilant. stocks would have gone up. one of the great specters hanging over our economy that we wouldn't raise the debt ceiling would have greatly mitigated in terms of damage and danger, and we could move on to the real issues of dealing with the fiscal cliff and dealing with our debt situation and not have a debt ceiling hanging out there as a diversionary but dangerous issue. but for some reason, inexplicable, the minority leader, the republican leader, changed his mind. now, he said on the floor well, important measures deserve 60 votes, but when he brought it up earlier, he acted as if he was in favor of it, he was offering it. and now, of course, essaying no, he's going to object to his own resolution. i wish he would reconsider. again, playing -- using the debt ceiling as leverage, using the debt ceiling as
columnist. he is with us from new york. yesterday, we spoke about the normalcy of the stock market but today reaction to what happened in washington with stocks tumbling, down more than 120 points. michael, thank you for being with us yet again. what are you looking at, here in washington, what our financial experts telling you? guest: the maneuvers yesterday, the failure to bring the boat disturbed a little bit of an overly comfortable consensus here in washington that a deal was pretty much in the bag. i think we are now having to yesterday, the failure toreconcile the newh is nothing likely to happen today. obviously, you want to hear what the speaker has to say. but right now, the market is hopeful that it gets at least what i would call a small bargain. i think that would be enough to satisfy financial types. let alone a very big picture budget questions that seemingly have been on and off the table variously for the past few weeks. host: "the wall street journal" in an editorial suggesting extending reality, which all tax cuts for the six months to give congress time to work out an agr
persuasions. new york city mayor michael bloomberg called the press conference a shameful evasion of the crisis facing our country. new jersey governor chris christie told reporters that armed guards won't make schools any safer. and senator-elect chris murphy of connecticut tweeted this earlier today. "walking out of another funeral, he was handed the nra transcript. the most revolting tone-deaf statement i've ever seen." indeed. right before wayne lapierre delivered his remarks, a gunman shot and killed three people in pennsylvania. one of the victims was a woman hanging up christmas decorations in a church. let's turn to virginia congressman jim moran. congressman, good to have you with us tonight. appreciate your time. always good to have you with us, jim, on this program. thank you. >> thank you, ed. >> what is -- what do you make of today's press conference, the reaction of the national rifle association? >> well, wayne lapierre works for the gun manufacturers. he really doesn't represent the majority of the members who are far more sane and responsible than the leadership i
time. i worked in new york city for about 28 years as a bilingual teacher and a certified credit counselor. if i could just give my personal testimony, i think you may be relevant to the issue here. i studied at hunter city college in new york for a master's degree in counseling. a masters degree, at that time, acquired only 30 credits -- graduate credits. i was in the last class that certified the 30 credits and afterwards it became 38 and now i believe it is 60. my training, i thought, was quite good. we had very experienced and talented professors. the objective was to put on the front lines some trained people to basically just be listening. to have the children referred to us and we have enough training to we could try to help them, or if we felt that the problem was severe enough, we could refer them. we had psychiatrists in new york available. school support teams. and i am now working in florida as is an adjunct professor at the college level. and my feeling is come, and i don't want to be too judgmental, but i think at the community college level and maybe colleges in ge
, a state like new york or california has a lot more poor people. and it also has a lot of rich people. it doesn't get the same break. i think you get 60% or over 60% reimbursement from the feds. you get 50%. you get -- i think it's you. get 60%. i can't remember everybody's numbers. i tried to educate myself. and in new york, we only get 50%. it makes a big difference. pam moynihan who always tried to change those formulas, ended up sake it's all james madison's fault. >> and we appreciate -- >> i think there are a couple of things that are terribly, terribly important and don't contradict anything that you all said. but we don't have a very good way of measuring the adequacy of our infrastructure. we know that the chinese spend eight times as high of percentage of their g.d.p. in infrastructure as we do in this country. and we know that that's got to make us less competitive. and i think i learned from the people at the chamber here that the cost of moving goods in the united states is greater in absolute dollars than it is in europe or in asia. and i don't know personally how you gr
and grandchildren. previously, a columnist and associate editor for "the new york sun" and chief speechwriter for read giuliani -- for rudy giuliani, he was responsible for writing the eulogies for the firefighters and fresh responders who died on 9/11. evelyn is also editor of the anthology "deadline of august, america's greatest newspaper columns." so now, let's listen to a conversation on growing up in the white house. please join me in welcoming them to the chautauqua stage. [applause] >> by way of beginning, last night, we were sitting up late talking about today's talk and i mentioned to linda, we had a column about your dad in it. you are quoted in it. i said, to that i don't have a copy of it. magically, there was a copy. it was called "touring dixie." this is just by way of saying -- hear the opening lines about lbj in which lynda features later in the column. "going to the south with president johnson is like going back to the chautauqua circuit." [laughter] you don't get better than that. as was indicated, we will just have a fun and casual conversation. we have two wonderful uniqu
the things the we do here, unemployment, energy problems -- when i get up in the morning, i get "the new york times," and the first place i go is the sports page. for a few minutes every morning, i dream of the athlete that i wanted to be. [laughter] and as i have dreamed over the decades, i thought, wouldn't it be great to be able to meet a babe ruth or lou gehrig? or maybe a rocky marciano? joe frazier? but today, i have been able to meet two of the people i have dreamed about going down to that 18th hole. with a good put, i can win this thing. this is a personal privilege for me to be able to meet the great jack nicklaus and to be here to help honor the great arnold palmer. we know that arnold palmer has played on the finest courses that the world has. he has designed 300 golf courses. seven of them are in nevada, operating now. he has won trophy after trophy after trophy. he has been swinging golf clubs since a little boy of four years old. he was always such a big star. i hope, arnold, you'll remember. you and winnie were traveling across the country. they stopped a long way from las veg
words followed by deeds. with that let me yield to the vice chair-elect, the gentleman from new york, mr. crowley. >> thank you, xavier. many of my colleagues have come to know my family in a personal way. all three of my children were born while i've been a member of congress. i have a little guy by the name of liam. he's 7 years old. and yesterday i learned of a little boy named ben wheeler who loved to ride the seven line, the seven train that goes from times square all the way out to what was once shea stadium, now citifield. i love the seven as well. so do my children. i saw on my face my own little boy and i think that for many of us, whether it be democrat or republican, that has to strike home. it certainly did for me and my family. i think that's what made this particular event, if you can say it's unique, it's unique in that the innocence that was lost on friday was like no other. not to even compare innocence of what happened in aurora to connecticut, but when little children are just taken in that way i think it brings all of us to this table. as john larson has said, inactio
groups -- tuareg groups. emerging from discussions in new york over the international community's approach to mali and the region. there is a strong feeling those tribes live there and will be there for a long time. did not have an ideology of wanting to strike the united states. they have a set of grievances, some that has an bound up with bad actors. it is in our interest to pry them away as best we can, that is why establishing a dialogue with the north is a part of the resolutions on mali. in general, it is wise to limit the number of enemies you have and not create new ones. at the same time, all those of taken on the aq affiliates that is to have that thought. in our treatment of al shabaab, we try to distinguish between those sort east africa, and al qaeda, recognizing that lots of al shabaab is only concerned with what goes on in somalia. similarly but look at - we see a group that is completely heterogeneous. some may be interested in terrorist activity. we try to take cognizance of that in our policy. sometimes is tough to have the stick -- the scalpel you need. >> i t
like to yield to our distinguished and vice chair, from new york. >> in politics, it is not a >> in politics, it is not a zero sum game. the least, that is my belief. it ought not be. we need to work together. there is no partisan path toward a solution. every solution facing our nation's problems must be done in a bipartisan way. that means that neither side gets 100% of what they are looking to achieve. what we saw last night was really an abdication of the process. the president has been working in good faith with speaker boehner, continues to what to do that. it is my hope we can come back to the table and continue to work with the president to work out a solution. what we have seen is something we have observed from our side of the aisle for the last four years. the republican caucus, whether the minority or majority, refused to work with our side of the aisle. the people of this election spoke otherwise. they want to see us working together. they want to see us lead him to the 113 congress, working in a more bipartisan way. i would like to turn it over to th
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